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20130103
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
cable satellite corp. 2012] >> a discussion on climate science and politics. paul by director of nasa's goddard institute of space studies. another look at religion and politics. tomorrow, we are joined by the indiana rep. he will talk about the 113th congress in his priorities. join us sunday at 10:00 eastern and again at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> as president obama begins his second term, what is the most important issue? >> if you are in grades 6 through 12, make a video about your message to the president. is your chance to win $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> next a discussion on climate science, politics, and global warming. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about one hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here. welcome. seven years ago, there was a consensus in washington that the earth's atmosphere could be altered. it is a different story. over the next hour, we will discuss opinion, with james hansen and our live audience here at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 201
continue the discussion on climate science now with james hanson, head of the nasa institute for space studies and author of "storms of my grandchildren." he was awarded an award named for the scientist who advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment.
, it turned out that it was a fellow republican, the chair of the house science committee, pro- sons, pro-environmental republican who came to defend my colleagues and me in this political witch hunt by his own fellow republican. a think you'll find this among many of my colleagues and scientists today. we do our best to frame this not as a bipartisan or political issue because it should not be. it is a fact of life that it has become somewhat of a partisan political issue. but there is some evidence that there are people on the republican side of the aisle were stepping up to challenge and do something about this problem. >> we sometimes make the mistake of saying that [indiscernible] science and values can provide the same information. i think they are completely complementary. signs is able to tell us what the problem is and what the consequences are of the trees is we make. our values is what happens from the sources. a village in alaska considers it already happened. a town and a texas might think it will not happen for a few tickets are lunker. we have to bring our values and to it.
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thoughtht i would show you wht thuld happen if we change into thspeaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $1
at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or theel
the science? you can see the scientific references and see where the studies were done at different research universities, the mayo clinic, harvard, and other places to see what the confirmation is all about. we can see that it improves the basics. , u r her rider, your engagement is stronger. every improvement translates to about 14 years on the average. after they are trained, the improvement would give them the memory level of an average person of about 56. we see faster and sharper thinking and acting. almost everything you do that involves making a decision about what you have seen or heard or acting in a complex behavior. this is certainly important from the point of view of for your sustaining independence. this is kind of interesting thing, right? people see things so much better that they have about half as many driving accidents, it makes a big difference in the safety of driving and also walking. we have seen improvements in health. the person spends about $300 less a year in health-care costs, that is because the brain training confers benefits and also to physical health from th
rate of spding were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking forereign language] eart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... announcer: this song was s created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. vision expanding to a 5-inch 1080p hd display and camera. touch acquiring nfc. hearing evolving with beats audio.. wireless charging activated. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i wod show youwhat thuld happen if wechange into the speaker boehner plan,
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
's chief science correspondent robert bazell who was at the hospital. good morning, robert. >> reporter: good morning, andr andrea. we don't know a lot of what's going on here. columbia university hospital is not saying much. we have a one sentence statement from hillary clinton's office which says, as you said, is being treated for a blood clot and it stemmed from a concussion she suffered a few days ago. the problem is that concussions, when they lead to blood clots, the blood clots are not usually treated with blood thinners as they say she's being treated. if she has a blood clot that occurred because she was sitting around or something, they would treat that with blood thinners and that would be fine. but there may be more to this story that we don't know. we'll have to watch it the next few days. as they say they're keeping her under observation to maek sure she's okay. andrea? >> let's hope for the best and thanks for the update, robert. >>> raising taxes on the wealthy is separating the two parties as the deadline to the fiscal cliff draws to within hours. unless aan agreement a
was given the boot by security. >> academy motion pictures arts and sciences extended the oscar voting deadline to tomorrow over fears issues of the new electronic voting system we will learn who was nominated next week patti ann. >> top sports stories northern illinois makes the first trip to the bowl championship series but it was anything but memorable. it was no match for the orange bowl. the huskies lost 31-10. they went on to beat the badgers 20-14. stanford's first rose bowl victory in 40 years. >>> angie reed may not be without a team for too long. they contacted the former coach and topic to coach the team. espn reports he could accept the job by the end of the week. >>> all things must come to an end including the clipper's 17 game winning streak. the nuggets won it was the longest streak since 2008 and franchise record for the clippers. >> the time 42 after the hour. still to come they asked members to pay more money but it turns out one teacher's union wanted to raise dues to pay for parties. we always hear being fat can kill you but could holding on to just a few extra pou
. accord fog the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract -- it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪ ♪ like the vampire said the economy sure sucks ♪ ♪ that's the paula polka everyone sing. ♪ that's the paula polka ♪ we love to read your comments always in such a large amount ♪ ♪ you like us, we like you, it's the facebook polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night, you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so everybody dance ♪ that's the "world news now" polka ♪ yeah! >>> this morning on "world news now," urgent meeting. the president orders lawmakers to top level negotiations to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> it's just four days until a pending financial fiasco that would cost every single america
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
gifts but others say they have it down to a science. >> make it in, say you that don't want it and they exchange it or -- they usually give you store credit. they won't give you money back. >> don't take it back, that's rude, just give it to someone else. >> may work. other people say instead of trading something they donate their unwanted gifts to charity. >> stanford fans headed to this year's rose ball game to see the cardinals battle wisconsin. the stadium is having a face lift but the big project is taking longer than expected. project managers say it's not going to be finished until 2015. >>> san jose state will play in the military bowl. it'll face bowling green. a team that ranks 7th in the nation. experts prwill come away with the win. the military bowl is set to kick off tomorrow at noon. >> should be a lot of fun. we are keeping track on the traffic. we understand there is caltrain delays. >> up to an hourlong and this is because of a system wide mechanical failure. trains in the north and southbound direction are impacted. we have a lot of spin outs in the s
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> i am adam shapiro with your fox business brief. stocks extended losses into a fourth session as washington battles. the u.s. is likely to roll off the fiscal cliff in just a few days. reid will speak to supporters about the negotiation at 3:00 p.m. eastern. right now, the dow is down. the conference index fell to the lowest level in four months. the six month outlook also fell to the lowest level since 2011. jobless claims fell to nearly a 4.5 year low last week with 350,000 americans filing for first-time benefits. that's the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ liz: welcome back. as if this fixing of the fiscal cliff is not hard enough. we have a storm going across the states. we have live team coverage. anna du quoin man is. let's start with peter barnes. peter: everything here at reagan national is pretty normal. there are a few delays. i looked at the schedule for maine which is getting hit very har
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)